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16 June 2022 @ 2:00 pm 3:30 pm PDT

Location: Stanley Park Information Booth
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IN-PERSON PROGRAM 

Spring is in bloom across the forest and gardens of Stanley Park. From cherry blossoms to rose bushes to tall chestnut trees, the decorative and introduced plants of the Park have unique histories and botanical features. Join Nina Shoroplova, author and photographer of Legacy of Trees: Purposeful Wandering in Vancouver’s Stanley Park, on a walk to explore some of the trees and shrubs of Brockton Point – a place with a long history of planting and community. Your first step is to find the giant sequoia tree at our meeting spot near the Information Booth! 
 
We are learning about botany on the land colonially known as Stanley Park, and throughout Brockton Point, the home of past communities comprised of Indigenous and marginalized racial minorities who were forced off this land in the 19th and 20th centuries, and still face discrimination. As we explore introduced plants in a transformed landscape, we are grateful to the past residents and current descendants of these communities for their past and ongoing stewardship and advocacy. 

EDUCATOR BIO 

Nina Shoroplova is a historian, researcher, photographer, and author. In 2020, she published Legacy of Trees: Purposeful Wandering in Vancouver’s Stanley Park, a touching and informative account of tree histories, planting and variety in Stanley Park. As a recent graduate of the Master Gardeners Association of BC, Nina takes every opportunity to share what she has learned about plants. 

This program will meet at the Stanley Park Information Booth (located on Stanley Park Drive, near the horse drawn tours). Please arrive 15 minutes early to complete a health check.  

Masks are mandatory for indoor programs and strongly suggested for outdoor programs. 

  

Accessibility note: We will be moving on some uneven surfaces (gravel, seawall, grass off paths) and moderate inclines, for up to 1.5 hours. If you have any questions about accessibility, please email Anna at publiced@stanleyparkecology.ca.   

  

***This program is weather dependent.  Please check your email 12 hours before the program date/time to confirm it has not been cancelled due to inclement weather such as high winds, heavy rain or extreme heat. Please dress appropriately for the weather. 

  

 

*By purchasing a ticket, you are agreeing to complete the following health checkat the start of your program.  

   

**All participants must pre-register for this program – NO DROP-INS ARE ALLOWED.Fees for this program are based on a sliding scale – you choose what you pay!       

   

****Program full or you can’t attend this day/time?Sign up here to be notified if this program runs again in the future!         

       

*****Cancellation policy – We are accommodating refunds for cancellations due to illness to keep everyone healthy, but the number of recent cancellations is impacting our capacity to run these programs. If you must cancel, please let us know if you need a refund or if you are able to help us offer affordable programs for the public (we will continue to seek ways of subsidizing programs in this changing economic climate as well!)         

       

We gratefully acknowledge that the land on which we gather and help steward is the unceded and traditional territories of the xʷməθkwəy̓əm (Musqueam), Skwxwú7mesh (Squamish) Nation, and Səl̓ílwətaʔ/Selilwitulh (Tsleil-Waututh) Nation. Since time immemorial, Coast Salish peoples have lived reciprocally with the land, harvesting and cultivating foods and medicines and practicing ceremony. The abundance of these lands and waters, which enables us to live, work, and play here today, is a result of the past and on-going stewardship and advocacy of the Coast Salish peoples.

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